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Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Synoptic Boost Scam

The scam continues, apparently.  The latest name for this fake drug touted by fake news is Synoptic Boost.  This is the same fake news technique that has been used to tout what is probably exactly the same useless pill under a wide variety of names as documented in various other blog posts; names listed below.  If you're reading this because you've seen a fake news item about a drug or nutritional supplement NOT on this list, please comment and give me the new name, and I will add it to the list.


Here is a screenshot relating to the Synoptic Boost scam, provided by a recent commenter.  Note that this is obviously made to look like "Business Insider" but actually called "Insider Business."


https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/attachment/u/0/?view=att&th=160263f0af62b2de&attid=0.1&disp=inline&realattid=f_jathoajq0&safe=1&zw&saddbat=ANGjdJ97F666enpizoyvp1LGnvZnvK5b0D0TDdTfnUPTSmgglR0mSaSTILOyoR5NYEVmXSKGRLZ4zow7D08KEe3gMbROiHWhusjicp48tKquJyKYHdCLu7PW-kk7AXmEAIHlLvmCek0pNXVkBD0OQqn0mMqPZAGDt1iE3MQW2P-eSbJd59Tl94HL_OcQK98a_SynisckpAW5FshW5GliFkqt4lot8SdJ9g-QSoPOMP5AXODOaptYBdWzizV31Fx6b0AN3HEy6eMPHo62XgvuwZFCfozgSCfd3S6OLqiJbevIe4P8t-RaL_HBwrrRN9J4XisC7mJ25o6AabbauW-fyQ9fEmJpLQLVHgTRHZ_Fea0xhSutH51LP6m2EKNY_0kbRb26PmvMlpOQwXzamQ8Yw8d62kGsg2iIflwIKXOfmYri7CAzJgTbFEr33THvklmLqgd_N7C4dic-MfeiD4dCVXsTlb7aLmkKMRq2uyFNB4XlprYL_5p4AjPp9_vmCYE689Sw2YlA87URsL7KNeZ9ydUN_OZn08kJhiqZ0S-N55wE-18qOqQwy-AG19_QKLYhr1lrRcAPTnIW62tHZNKh978SAny95SIdiMsYDi1xOQ

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I like the new twist -- it will be "Banned from the Public" so you better act fast!!  


And here's a copy of the opening of my January 2017 post on "Intelleral," which lists the various names that have been used for the supplement, as well as the celebrities whose fake endorsements have been used, and includes FTC contact information.  As of this writing, I haven't heard that the FTC has taken any action, so if you've been victimized by this scam, I suggest you contact them:


Another day, another name for the scam.  This time it's "Intelleral."  So add intelleral to the list of pills that Stephen Hawking and the rest of them are supposedly saying all are the "one pill" that will change everything.  Here's the current list:

Addium
BrainPlus IQ
Neurocell
Synagen
Cogniq
Alpha ZXT
Intellux
Brainfire
Brainstorm
Intelleral

And here's a link to my post on Geniux.

So in case you had any doubt, it's a total scam.  I've taken the time to reproduce the text and photos of this one below, just in case it would be useful evidence in a legal proceeding some day.  Whoever is doing this -- and I believe it's a large-scale scam, where someone who wrote the "report" and the associated software is selling it to other scamsters who sell snake-oil pills -- needs to spend some time in jail.

The interesting difference with this latest iteration is that they are no longer using the CNN logo.  And in the places where the news source is mentioned, it says CMN.  Maybe that's because CNN has software that monitors the internet for possible trademark infringement.  Of course, just because they changed the name slightly doesn't mean it's not trademark infringement -- they are still using CNN's trade dress in all kinds of ways (including with Anderson Cooper).


And here's the list of fake celebrity endorsers:

Stephen Hawking
Anderson Cooper
Another day, another name for the scam.  This time it's "Intelleral."  So add intelleral to the list of pills that Stephen Hawking and the rest of them are supposedly saying all are the "one pill" that will change everything.  Here's the current list:

Addium
BrainPlus IQ
Neurocell
Synagen
Cogniq
Alpha ZXT
Intellux
Brainfire
Brainstorm
Intelleral

And here's a link to my post on Geniux.

So in case you had any doubt, it's a total scam.  I've taken the time to reproduce the text and photos of this one below, just in case it would be useful evidence in a legal proceeding some day.  Whoever is doing this -- and I believe it's a large-scale scam, where someone who wrote the "report" and the associated software is selling it to other scamsters who sell snake-oil pills -- needs to spend some time in jail.

The interesting difference with this latest iteration is that they are no longer using the CNN logo.  And in the places where the news source is mentioned, it says CMN.  Maybe that's because CNN has software that monitors the internet for possible trademark infringement.  Of course, just because they changed the name slightly doesn't mean it's not trademark infringement -- they are still using CNN's trade dress in all kinds of ways (including with Anderson Cooper).


And here's the list of fake celebrity endorsers:

Stephen Hawking
Anderson Cooper
Ashton Kutcher
Denzel Washington
Tom Brady
Bradley Cooper
Kanye West
Tiger Woods
Will Smith
George Clooney
Quentin Tarantino
Daniel Craig
Bill Gates
Dr. Oz
Sir Isaac Newton

Again, if you care, you can report this to the FTC.  In the past I've suggested contacting Richard Cleland, assistant director in the Division of Advertising Practices at the Federal Trade Commission, who has gone after similar scams in the past.

Mr. Cleland's contact info is readily available on the internet here: For convenience here is his phone number and email address:

Richard Cleland
Assistant Director Division of Advertising Practices
Phone: 202-326-3088
Email: rcleland@ftc.gov

If you're annoyed by this scam -- or have been victimized by it -- I suggest you call or email Mr. Cleland and point him to this site.  You can mention FTC Complaint Ref. No. 65703157, although that doesn't seem to have gone anywhere.
 
Ashton Kutcher
Denzel Washington
Tom Brady
Bradley Cooper
Kanye West
Tiger Woods
Will Smith
George Clooney
Quentin Tarantino
Daniel Craig
Bill Gates
Dr. Oz
Sir Isaac Newton

Again, if you care, you can report this to the FTC.  In the past I've suggested contacting Richard Cleland, assistant director in the Division of Advertising Practices at the Federal Trade Commission, who has gone after similar scams in the past.

Mr. Cleland's contact info is readily available on the internet here: For convenience here is his phone number and email address:

Richard Cleland
Assistant Director Division of Advertising Practices
Phone: 202-326-3088
Email: rcleland@ftc.gov

If you're annoyed by this scam -- or have been victimized by it -- I suggest you call or email Mr. Cleland and point him to this site.  You can mention FTC Complaint Ref. No. 65703157, although that doesn't seem to have gone anywhere.
 

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